SAN DIEGO -- It's going to be a busy spring for Rick Renteria, who will not only handle his duties as the bench coach of the Padres but will manage Team Mexico in the World Baseball Classic.

No official announcement has been made yet, though it appears Renteria will manage the team when the World Baseball Classic begins in March.

Renteria had a conversation recently with former Padres first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, who will be a captain on the team. Gonzalez, who is now with the Dodgers, asked Renteria if he would be interested in managing the team in the Classic.

"Anyone would be extremely flattered to be asked, and I am," Renteria said Tuesday.

Renteria was born in California though his parents and his brother were born in Mexico. He played in the Major Leagues from 1986-94 and also spent four seasons playing in the Mexican League.

"I'm proud for all the opportunities that have been extended to us," Renteria said. "It will be an honor to represent your heritage and culture."

This is Renteria's second season as bench coach for the Padres. He was previously the Padres' first-base coach from 2008-10.

He has been a part of the organization since 2003 and is highly regarded in his current role, so much so that he had a phone interview with the Blue Jays for their manager opening before the 2011 season.

"I think it's great, I think it's an honor to manage a country as opposed to a team," Padres manager Bud Black said. "He'll do great."

Team Mexico will be a part of Pool D, which will run from March 7-10 at Chase Field in Phoenix and Salt River Fields at Talking Stick in Scottsdale. Other teams in the pool are the United States, Italy as well as a qualifier that hasn't been determined.

The top two teams from Pool D advance to second-round play, March 12-16 at Marlins Park in Miami.

Team Mexico is 5-7 overall in World Baseball Classic play. Its best finish came in 2006, when it finished sixth.

For Street, 200th save is just 'a stop along the way'

SAN DIEGO -- When closer Huston Street recorded the final out in Sunday's 6-4 victory in San Francisco, he breathed a sigh of relief. Not only because it was the first save Street had collected since returning from a stint on the disabled list that lasted more than a month, but also because it marked the 200th save of the 29-year-old's career.

Street had been stuck at 199 saves since early August, when he was placed on the DL with a strained left calf, and was especially eager to get to the 200-save milestone.

"I think everybody knows when you're sitting on something like 199," Street said. "You want to get past it just to get past it."

As one of 10 active pitchers with 200 career saves, Street also feels like he is only now coming into his own in his eighth season in the Majors.

"It's a round number, it's a pretty number," Street said of 200 saves. "At the same time, it feels more like a stop along the way. I'm 29, and I really feel like I'm just kind of starting to understand what it is to pitch in my role with my stuff in the ninth inning."

Despite also battling a strained right lat muscle in May, Street has amassed 22 saves this season, converting in each of his opportunities for the Padres, who signed the All-Star to a two-year contract extension worth $14 million in July.

"This year was just one of those crazy years," Street said. "When I've been on the field, it really has been my best year. It's the most comfortable I've felt outing to outing. Injuries have taken a lot of that away from me, frustratingly so, because you want to get locked into that rhythm, you want to build off that."

Street also spoke of building on the improvement he's seen through the course of the year from this Padres team.

"Overall, I'm satisfied with the year," Street said. "I'm satisfied to the extent that I feel like this team has grown a bunch, and that I'm going to get to be a part of it for at least two more years."