ARI@COL: Prado's great relay nails Rosario at third

SAN FRANCISCO -- Ideally, D-backs manager Kirk Gibson would like to leave Martin Prado at third base every day.

But things are not ideal right now for the D-backs. Not with key injuries depleting their roster and an offense that has struggled of late to score runs.

Gibson said last week in New York that after Prado played four positions in two days, he wanted to settle on a position for him.

However, Prado started at third Saturday, second Sunday and in left field Monday.

By playing Prado in left rather than third Monday, Gibson was able to get Eric Chavez's bat into the lineup at third.

"I don't want to do it," Gibson said. "We need more offense, so that's just the way it worked out. Ideally I don't have to do it. What I said initially, I said if you need to do it, he can take it. I do believe there's more stability, I think, if you leave them in one spot more often. He's not a utility guy."

Prado is off to a slow start offensively, hitting .241, but Gibson does not believe that has anything to do with shuffling him around.

"He's fine; he just loves to play," Gibson said. "Prado is one of those guys that when things don't go well he works harder; he wants a bigger challenge."

Montero optimistic hitting will come around

ARI@COL: Montero plates Pollock with groundout

SAN FRANCISCO -- Miguel Montero entered Monday's game 2-for-19 through the first six games of this road trip, but the D-backs catcher is not overly concerned.

"I feel all right, I don't feel bad," Montero said. "Just haven't got a hit. I'm seeing the ball good. I'm laying off too many good pitches and swinging at too many bad pitches. I just have to make the transition to swing at the good pitches and lay off the bad pitches."

Don't misunderstand: Montero is not pleased with the numbers, but he also understands that it's a long season and he knows that things have a way of evening themselves out, especially when you have a track record of being a good hitter like he does.

What bothers him most is not coming through with runners in scoring position and a chance to break open a game.

Yet each day he comes to the park, he said, he thinks could be the day that he turns it around.

"Obviously you want to get hits and especially at key moments," Montero said. "I've had a couple of opportunities to bring a couple of guys in and change a game, but it's part of the game; everyone goes through it. I don't feel like I'm in a slump; I don't feel like I'm struggling. I'm just not getting any hard hits. It will come. Today could be different. One day I'm going to wake up and feel good at the plate."

D-backs hope to follow Giants' example

4/21/13: D-backs rally to win a close one

SAN FRANCISCO -- The D-backs have a tremendous amount of respect for the Giants and in some ways have used the Giants as a model in building their team.

"I think they're a pretty good example by what they do," D-backs manager Kirk Gibson said.

The Giants have won two of the last three World Series, so that in and of itself is something to admire, but it's their style of play that attracts the D-backs.

The D-backs believe that, like the Giants, their team is built around pitching, and this past offseason they continued their trend toward acquiring hitters with better plate discipline and a grind-it-out mentality, much like what they feel the Giants have.

Gibson is even a big fan of Giants manager Bruce Bochy.

"They battle, but they're good at everything," Gibson said. "They're just a well-rounded team. They do so many things good, I think you have to match it. Bochy has been doing it for a while -- respect him tremendously; he's a good friend. Love competing against him and there's a lot to learn by watching what they do."

The crowds at AT&T Park can be rough on visiting teams, but Gibson even likes that.

"It's good, it's a good environment," he said. "Good city, fun place to play."